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Modeling

 

Techniques Conditioning > Modeling

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Modeling as a means of conditioning or training involves physically moving the subject through the action, manually guiding their movement.

When modeling, use gentle and firm touch, so your subject knows where you want them to go. If they are not ready to be guided, you may be able to find a way of distracting them from their resistance, such as caressing or using a lure.

When working with people, you may be able to guide their movement by using instruction ('Now move your hand in a bit - that's right - bit more...').

Do ask people first if you can model them. If modeling with children, ask their parents or guardians for permission. Always be sensitive to use appropriate and minimum necessary touch, of course.

If modeling does not seem to work or is not liked, seek other methods of training.

Example

A dog trainer uses a lead to help teach the dog to walk to heel, coaxing them in close, using suitable rewards and praise.

A father, when showing him how to use a bat, puts his arms around his son and grasps his son's hands, guiding him through the swinging action.

Discussion

Some subjects willingly submit to modeling, while others may be less willing to go along with you. Resistance can be caused by a number of reasons, such as:

  • They find the pressure you are applying uncomfortable.
  • The movement makes them feel they are losing balance and so they try to regain their position.
  • They dislike others trying to control them and react against this.
  • They are confused about what you want.
  • They think this is a game and move according to play rules.

Modeling suits some topics more than others. Typically, the best topics are those where specific movements are typical. Most animal training involves movement. Human training is only sometimes physical and mimicry may be a better option, depending on the topic and subject.

See also

Shaping, Mimicry

 

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